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Dickens - Little Dorritt
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roseisa



Joined: 25 Mar 2007
Posts: 334
Location: CA

PostPosted: Tue Apr 28, 2009 11:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Susan/DC
Quote:
As for the bit about Amy not accepting the inheritance because she didn't want to hurt Arthur's pride, this is a fairly common occurrence in older stories. Drives me crazy -- a man who isn't strong enough to deal with a wealthy wife isn't hero material to me.


I'm sorry I mislead with not explaining further of why Little Dorrit did not accept the inheritance. Arthur's mother "Mrs. Clennam" had begged Little Dorrit for forgiveness giving her a paper that stated the will and the truth of Arthur's birth. Little Dorrit forgave, Mrs. Clennam dies. And then came the good news that Arthur's firm had re-established itself and that he would be able now to leave the debtors' prison.

The reason Little Dorrit didn't claim the inheritance was because she did not want Arthur hurt by the circumstances of his birth and the family's deception. Little Dorrit loved Arthur that much. Wink Little Dorrit had Arthur burn the paper and Little Dorrit told Arthur that he should tell her that he loved her which he did and they were married with the sun shining on them through the painted figure of our Saviour on the window. Who knew that Dickens was such a romantic Question

I understand your irritation with men who refuse the money based on pride and I detest the story where the man marries the heroine for money and is suddenly maddenly inlove with the heroine after treating the heroine as a nuisance. As a matter of fact, wasn't that one of the issues with Private Arrangements by Sherry Thomas? To quote These Old Shades - Bah!
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Shar0n



Joined: 18 Feb 2009
Posts: 47

PostPosted: Thu Apr 30, 2009 11:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

roseisa wrote:
Susan/DC
Quote:
As for the bit about Amy not accepting the inheritance because she didn't want to hurt Arthur's pride, this is a fairly common occurrence in older stories. Drives me crazy -- a man who isn't strong enough to deal with a wealthy wife isn't hero material to me.


I'm sorry I mislead with not explaining further of why Little Dorrit did not accept the inheritance. Arthur's mother "Mrs. Clennam" had begged Little Dorrit for forgiveness giving her a paper that stated the will and the truth of Arthur's birth. Little Dorrit forgave, Mrs. Clennam dies. And then came the good news that Arthur's firm had re-established itself and that he would be able now to leave the debtors' prison.

The reason Little Dorrit didn't claim the inheritance was because she did not want Arthur hurt by the circumstances of his birth and the family's deception. Little Dorrit loved Arthur that much. Wink Little Dorrit had Arthur burn the paper and Little Dorrit told Arthur that he should tell her that he loved her which he did and they were married with the sun shining on them through the painted figure of our Saviour on the window. Who knew that Dickens was such a romantic Question

I understand your irritation with men who refuse the money based on pride and I detest the story where the man marries the heroine for money and is suddenly maddenly inlove with the heroine after treating the heroine as a nuisance. As a matter of fact, wasn't that one of the issues with Private Arrangements by Sherry Thomas? To quote These Old Shades - Bah!


Thank you so much for filling us in on the details that seemed to have been fast forwarded/skipped in the movie.

I suspect I must be in the minority who felt somewhat disgusted at Dickens' development of the situation that brought about Arthur and Amy's union. The scene in which Amy sworn utter devotion to Arthur after nursing him back to health struck me as a self-centered aging man's fantasy rather than romantic. (Perhaps knowing too much about an author's personal life is not such a good idea.)

BTW, does anyone else also feel a sense of deja vu watching the Ponzi scheme unfold knowing that behind the scene there was a mismanagement war?
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