AAR
Click here for full forums index
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 
 
If This Author Were a Chef . . .
Goto page 1, 2  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    AAR Forum Index -> Romance Potpourri Forum
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Schola



Joined: 10 Jun 2007
Posts: 1867

PostPosted: Sun Nov 16, 2008 2:46 am    Post subject: If This Author Were a Chef . . . Reply with quote

+IHS+

If your favourite author were a chef, what kind of cuisine would she (or he!) specialise in?

I fancy that Jo Beverley dishes out experimental fusion cuisine, Kresley Cole is hosting a barbecue, Leigh Greenwood serves home cooked meals, and Julia Quinn does pastries and other deserts rather than main dishes.

I'm still thinking about what kind of food Lisa Kleypas would serve, but I know it should be filling rather than fancy.
_________________
"To be in a romance is to be in uncongenial surroundings. To be born into this earth is to be born into uncongenial surroundings, hence to be born into a romance." (G.K. Chesterton)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Elaine S



Joined: 02 Apr 2007
Posts: 667
Location: Rural England

PostPosted: Sun Nov 16, 2008 5:05 am    Post subject: Re: If This Author Were a Chef . . . Reply with quote

[quote="Schola"]+IHS+

If your favourite author were a chef, what kind of cuisine would she (or he!) specialise in?quote]

May Balogh would serve a perfectly cooked British "Sunday Lunch". Wonderful roast beef, golden Yorkshire puddings, lovely roasted veggies and fab sherry trifle for pudding.

Carla Kelly would do a wonderful frontier elk stew with coffee and homemade biscuits.

Joan Collins would treat you to a great Caesar Salad in the Grill Room at the Dorchester.

Jane Austen would serve roasted partidges with game chips and old fashioned English summer salads.

Georgette Heyer would take you to The Pump Room in Bath and treat you to a proper English tea with a glass of the famous waters (it's not that obnoxious but I would recommend eating your tea first!).

Bernard Cornwell would order you up a great greasy fry-up at a suitable roadside cafe on the A5 somewhere in deepest Staffordshire whilst on a book signing tour in the UK. Eggs, bacon, sausages, black pudding, fried mushrooms, fried bread, tomatoes, beans and lots of "workman's tea" strong enough to stand the spoon in!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
LinnieGayl



Joined: 22 Mar 2007
Posts: 824

PostPosted: Sun Nov 16, 2008 7:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

If Jayne Ann Krentz were a chef, she would definitely do Japanese or vegetarian (with an Asian twist) cuisine.
_________________
LinnieGayl
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
dick



Joined: 22 Mar 2007
Posts: 2505

PostPosted: Sun Nov 16, 2008 10:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

On the other hand, from reading her trads, I'd opine that Balogh would serve a rather bitter brew, and whatever Krentz served would have a sharp after-bite. Austen would probably serve shish-ka-bob flavored with curry.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Kerstin



Joined: 23 Mar 2007
Posts: 1124
Location: Germany

PostPosted: Sun Nov 16, 2008 12:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

dick wrote:
On the other hand, from reading her trads, I'd opine that Balogh would serve a rather bitter brew, and whatever Krentz served would have a sharp after-bite. Austen would probably serve shish-ka-bob flavored with curry.


LOL. Balogh would probably cook a traditional Chinese meal, beef with bitter cucumbers. It actually doesn't taste badly and rather interestingly but it can leaves a bitter taste in your mouth, depending on your mood.

Anne Stuart would cook something extremely spicy which makes your mouth burn like hell. Something with five plus pepperonis on the menu.

Nicole Jordan would serve aphrodisiac food such as oysters, asparagus, bananas with dark chocolate...


Kerstin
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
xina



Joined: 22 Mar 2007
Posts: 6635
Location: minneapolis

PostPosted: Sun Nov 16, 2008 2:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

When I first saw this thread, I thought I couldn't wrap my brain around it for an idea, but after thinking on it I've come up with a few...
Mary Balogh, I thought right off the bat, to me, would serve, Dark Godiva Chocolate Cheesecake with a side of rich french roast coffee or a small glass of Petite Sirah. Her prose, to me, is rich and flowing like all the textures in this food.
Contemporary authors...Robyn Carr....Cheeseburger and onion rings with a thick rich chocolate malt...from an award-winning cafe. And to add to that...Nora Roberts would be the same meal, only from McDonalds. Not necessarily a bad meal, but quick and the restaurants can be found anywhere.
_________________
"As you wish"
~The Princess Bride
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Schola



Joined: 10 Jun 2007
Posts: 1867

PostPosted: Mon Nov 17, 2008 3:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the replies, everyone! Very Happy

What I find most fascinating, however, is how Balogh fans seem to view her work very, very differently:

Elaine S wrote:
Mary Balogh would serve a perfectly cooked British "Sunday Lunch". Wonderful roast beef, golden Yorkshire puddings, lovely roasted veggies and fab sherry trifle for pudding.


dick wrote:
On the other hand, from reading her trads, I'd opine that Balogh would serve a rather bitter brew


Kerstin wrote:
Balogh would probably cook a traditional Chinese meal, beef with bitter cucumbers. It actually doesn't taste badly and rather interestingly but it can leaves a bitter taste in your mouth, depending on your mood.


xina wrote:
Mary Balogh, I thought right off the bat, to me, would serve, Dark Godiva Chocolate Cheesecake with a side of rich french roast coffee or a small glass of Petite Sirah. Her prose, to me, is rich and flowing like all the textures in this food.


I've read only a few of her books, none of them Trads, and I'm inclined to side with Elaine S.
_________________
"To be in a romance is to be in uncongenial surroundings. To be born into this earth is to be born into uncongenial surroundings, hence to be born into a romance." (G.K. Chesterton)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
dick



Joined: 22 Mar 2007
Posts: 2505

PostPosted: Mon Nov 17, 2008 10:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

to schola: But the majority of Balogh's trads are very different from her later books. A dip into "Dancing with Clara," "Tempting Harriet," amongst others, and certainly the Web books, will, I think change your mind. Some of the later books as well, depict relationships which can sour the taste--until the HEA, at least.

When I first started reading in the genre, I didn't know what people meant when they referred to "trads," but nearly every time, Balogh was held up as the sine qua non of writers of trads. When I finally got around to reading some of them, I was astonished that the relationships in many of them are replete with bitter angst. In very few of them, can an HEA be justified.

As an aside: In addition to Lowell's, Karen Ranney's style is sometimes downright exceptional. Have you read any of hers?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
xina



Joined: 22 Mar 2007
Posts: 6635
Location: minneapolis

PostPosted: Mon Nov 17, 2008 10:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Schola wrote:
Thanks for the replies, everyone! Very Happy

What I find most fascinating, however, is how Balogh fans seem to view her work very, very differently:




Well, I think this proves that as readers, we all have very different opinions about books and authors. Every answer here reflects that.
_________________
"As you wish"
~The Princess Bride
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Maggie AAR
Site Admin


Joined: 23 Mar 2007
Posts: 2487

PostPosted: Mon Nov 17, 2008 2:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

dick wrote:
to schola: But the majority of Balogh's trads are very different from her later books. A dip into "Dancing with Clara," "Tempting Harriet," amongst others, and certainly the Web books, will, I think change your mind. Some of the later books as well, depict relationships which can sour the taste--until the HEA, at least.


I think in a way you are right, dick. "Dancing with Clara" and "Tempting Harriet" would be bitter foods.

"The Notorious Rake" would be a hodge podge -- a mix of Chineese fried rice with egg plant parmesan and a rich chocolate cake -- all fine on their own but the ingredients don't mix.

To me though some of her trads are the perfect lunch described by Elaine S., some are a simple afternoon tea and yet others a feast.

On the flip side many of the books I listed as bitter are favorites of other readers.

I would list Quinn as the lightest of desserts, a meringue dish that virtually melts in the mouth. The taste doesn't linger and you can't describe it very well when asked about it.

Edited to add:

Robyn Carr would serve a hearty meal -- rich beef stew or chilli perhaps with deer meat or buffalo, home baked bread on the side with a sliver of real butter, an apple or peach pie (maybe ala mode depending on the weather) and all of it served with a brew or hot, well made coffee.

Nora Roberts is barbecue -- a nice set of ribs done just right, corn on the cob (real butter), fresh garden salad, iced tea, homemade beans (none of that canned stuff), fresh baked rolls and really delicious chocolate cake for desert. It's an all American meal with no real surprises but when done right it's the absolute best! And filling enough to keep you going all day -- and night.

Nalini Singh would be exotic -- a rich meaty meal with surprising spices and drinks that are rich and sweet with a bit of a kick.

JR Ward would be steak served rare or medium rare, some kind of prickly side dish and dangerous appetizers.

maggie b.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
xina



Joined: 22 Mar 2007
Posts: 6635
Location: minneapolis

PostPosted: Mon Nov 17, 2008 10:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

David Sedaris and Christopher Moore...Petite Filet and Shrimp, Chop Salad and for dessert...Chocolate Sin Cake (yum) with a lovely Cabernay Sauvignon.

Paullina Simons...Pork Tenderloin with apples and breaded cabbage. Cheese Blintzes for dessert. Vodka or Chardonnay on the side. Wink

Susan Carroll (her wonderful Dark Queen series) Chicken with Braised Fennel, Apple and Watercress Salad and for dessert...Creme Brulee...with a nice Reisling or Chardonnay.


Mary Balogh...more deep rich chocolate desserts that melt in you mouth. Yummy, beautiful and special all around. Smile
_________________
"As you wish"
~The Princess Bride
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Schola



Joined: 10 Jun 2007
Posts: 1867

PostPosted: Tue Nov 18, 2008 3:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

dick wrote:
to schola: But the majority of Balogh's trads are very different from her later books. A dip into "Dancing with Clara," "Tempting Harriet," amongst others, and certainly the Web books, will, I think change your mind. Some of the later books as well, depict relationships which can sour the taste--until the HEA, at least.

When I first started reading in the genre, I didn't know what people meant when they referred to "trads," but nearly every time, Balogh was held up as the sine qua non of writers of trads. When I finally got around to reading some of them, I was astonished that the relationships in many of them are replete with bitter angst. In very few of them, can an HEA be justified.


Hmmmm. I've read The Gilded Web and liked it well enough. Yes, the heroine was incredibly angsty, but I think the hero helped to heal her. I don't think she scarred him that badly (since, if I remember correctly, she dumped him and then declared her undying love for him in the space of a few days); but perhaps it gets "worse" in the other two books.

I was actually planning to read One Night for Love and The Secret Pearl sometime this weekend. While reading their synopses, I actually asked myself, "Do you want to put yourself through all that?" Laughing Even from a distance, I knew I was in for an emotional gauntlet of sorts.

dick wrote:
As an aside: In addition to Lowell's, Karen Ranney's style is sometimes downright exceptional. Have you read any of hers?


I haven't tried Ranney at all. I don't think my bookstore carries her titles--or if it does, that it stocks them in the Romance section. Which ones do you recommend?
_________________
"To be in a romance is to be in uncongenial surroundings. To be born into this earth is to be born into uncongenial surroundings, hence to be born into a romance." (G.K. Chesterton)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
graceC



Joined: 28 Mar 2007
Posts: 471

PostPosted: Tue Nov 18, 2008 10:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

xina wrote:
Nora Roberts would be the same meal, only from McDonalds. Not necessarily a bad meal, but quick and the restaurants can be found anywhere.


What a spot on observation. That's exactly what I think NR would serve too!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
dick



Joined: 22 Mar 2007
Posts: 2505

PostPosted: Tue Nov 18, 2008 11:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

to schola: Neither One Night for Love nor The Secret Pearl are as full of misery as say, Tempting Harriet, even though, as in the trads, the HEA comes late and unexpected and in an almost accidental fashion. I find it difficult, in fact, to include a number of the trads in the genre "romance fiction." They are, rather, unuusually perceptive insights into particular personalities which just happen to end happily because Balogh decides that's the way it will be.

As to Ranney: Nearly any of her books will do--When the Laird Returns, Till Next We Meet, My Beloved. Her style has a musing, almost philosophical tone, which sneaks up on you. One nearly misses, sometimes, the aptness of her metaphors: "...momentous events are often heralded not bya thunderclap but by a sigh." (When the Laird Returns). Or "This moment, strung out like beads of moisture on a spiderweb, so infinitesimal, had the effect of altering his entire future." (Till Next We Meet.)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Elaine S



Joined: 02 Apr 2007
Posts: 667
Location: Rural England

PostPosted: Tue Nov 18, 2008 12:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

graceC wrote:
xina wrote:
Nora Roberts would be the same meal, only from McDonalds. Not necessarily a bad meal, but quick and the restaurants can be found anywhere.


What a spot on observation. That's exactly what I think NR would serve too!


I agree and think that some authors begin to serve up cookie-cutter books just like McDonalds serves up cookie-cutter meals and Nora Roberts is only one of them, IMO. Just too, too prolific.

Interesting the various takes on Mary Balogh. When I said I thought she would serve up a perfect British Sunday Lunch, it was a little tongue in cheek.

This is a very traditional meal, enjoyed by the family together (though perhaps not so much these days) and one over which inexperienced cooks sweat buckets. This is because although the menu is simple and very traditional (the roast beef of Olde England, etc), it is still a difficult meal to produce perfectly because you have a number of dishes you must bring together that have disparate cooking times and techniques.

This is why I admire Mary Balogh so much - her books may sometimes be bittersweet and full of tribulations but when it's time to wash up the dishes, there is the satisfaction in having read a perfectly crafted book that some would criticise as simplistic and not a worthy literary effort but which is, in the end, very beautifully written and superbly crafted. The HEA may be in spite of an oven that is not working properly or yorkshire puddings that don't rise! A good sherry trifle looks like a very sweet and fluffy bowl of cream but a good traditional recipe has surpises and alcoholic kicks in it to tickle the tastebuds!

(Oh, gosh, what a load of mixed metaphors!!!!!!!!!)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    AAR Forum Index -> Romance Potpourri Forum All times are GMT - 5 Hours
Goto page 1, 2  Next
Page 1 of 2

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group