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“Womenomics” & the Palin Nomination
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bbmedos



Joined: 26 Sep 2007
Posts: 274
Location: Western Kentucky, USA

PostPosted: Wed Sep 10, 2008 7:46 am    Post subject: Re: “Womenomics” & the Palin Nomination Reply with quote

SH wrote:
bbmedos wrote:
In a way, though, that's the point, isn't it? His story answers some of the question but it seems we're demanding the answer to be spelled out by her personally. Which does bother me to some extent.

Don't get me wrong. I do understand that she's appeared virtually out of nowhere so there are a lot of unanswered questions that do have answered. I'm not against that. I'm simply suggesting that they can't all be answered in a day. Or a week. Which is about what it's been. More or less.

Conversely, oddly enough, some of the answers are already out there if one simply looks for them with an open mind. The Internet really is a wonderful thing. Very Happy


I hear you, but perhaps you might also consider my side of the story: I, who watched both conventions for the first time only this year, heard of Biden's story for the first time during the DNC. My impression of the RNC was that preciously little was said of Palin, to the point that I wondered whether this was done purposely to create some air of mystery. I've been searching for days for more information (and I verify what I found at factcheck.org) but I didn't find much until these past two days. My frustration is pretty much the opposite of yours: a fresh new face was introduced but not much information was laid out by the introducer. At the end, those who ask questions are scolded for not asking the right questions.


Look, I'm not disputing any of this but I have to wonder because I been hearing most of her story batted around since she was announced. They were talking about her husband being a stay at home dad at least in part from day one of McCain announcing her in many reports on FoxNews. So maybe it's not a question of the campaign being stingy with information given out but of what various, um, prevayers of information choose to reveal for their own agenda. Hmmm?

And it goes back farther than that. People have been talking about her on FoxNews in relation to the Vice Presidential race over the last nine months or so since McCain locked down the nomination. There have a surprising number of top leadership figures in the Republican establishment who've mentioned Palin as a possibility. I don't believe anyone ever thought she had a real chance, not because she wasn't qualified but because I honestly don't think they thought the situation would work out where she would get the chance. There is a difference. Although one or two did actually say in recent months that they thought McCain should choose her regardless.

They all alreadyapparently knew her "situation", however. They'd met her at governor's conferences or various other functions for the last two years and have been blown away by her. If there's nothing to find about her home life online, it's probably because it's so normal no one thought to make a big deal of it before.

And that's what I'm talking about.
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Tee



Joined: 22 Mar 2007
Posts: 4223
Location: Detroit Metro

PostPosted: Wed Sep 10, 2008 3:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just for fun, I thought some of you may be interested in a column written for the BBC News in England and dated today, Sep 10, re: (who else?) Sarah Palin. The link follows--

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/7607039.stm
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KarenS



Joined: 23 Mar 2007
Posts: 870
Location: Florida

PostPosted: Thu Sep 11, 2008 10:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

LisaW wrote:
KarenS wrote:


Quote:
3. Spending on hunting vs. education: could you source your statement? This Education Week report seems to indicate that Palin has done a decent, though not brilliant, job on educational issues. Also, from the data I could find, Alaskan graduation rates are low - but not the lowest in the US (I must note that I couldn't find data from the last two years).


According to KTVF in Fairbanks, Alaska in an education report from the Alaska Commission on Post-Secondary Education, Alaska was at the bottom as reported on May 14, 2008. Actually, I am surprised at this. There are several southern states who often vie for that honor. My state included said to say.


IIRC, the state of New Jersey has the highest per student cost for education. By your analogy, since NJ spends the most, they ought to have the most highly educated students in the country ... but NJ is running 8th (the last time I looked it up). Guess what ... throwing dollars at education does absolutely nothing. It requires the dedication of the parents, the teachers, the school administrators and the students for students to receive a proper education. Parents need to instill in their children the thirst for knowledge ... and they can tie it into making a better living. The parents also need to make sure they are on top of what their schools are doing.

But, as with everything else, KarenS seems more interested in what sounds bad rather than what is real or the truth.


Using data from 2005-2006, New York was ahead of New Jersey in spending per student. If as you say, New Jersey spent all this money on students and ranked only 8th in the nation, I would say 8th is pretty damn good. Sure beats being 50th in the nation. By right, New Jersey's money is better spent than the states that spend less. Money is like fertilizer, it doesn't do any good unless you spread it around. So spending money on students does matter. It provides for much-needed tools(books, learning labs, etc.), well-trained teachers who can support themselves on a teaching salary and decent facilities where the students are in a safe environment. It all adds up.

There must be a commitment on the part of the parents. They must value education. If the parents place a premium on education so will their kids. If the parents could care less then the kids will share the same attitude. The kids who do the best come from homes where parents instill a love of learning. Is it fair? No but who says like is fair. Sure there are kids that are exceptions but they are most likely to have some other adult who takes an interest in them. Knowing that someone cares about you makes all the difference in a child's life.

Wouldn't it be great if every student graduated from high school and then went on to pursue their interests? That should be a goal of educating our students. For some reason this isn't happening. It's our loss as a nation when we have drop-outs who don't contribute. But as a nation, we don't value education like we should. We give it lip-service yet there is an anti-intellectual bent in this country. We don't want smart leaders, we want likeable leaders.

There is a poster that can be purchased titled "Justification for Higher Education." Unfortunately, it focuses on several cars parked in a mega-garage and a big mansion overlooking the ocean. It's good for a few laughs but getting a decent education is more than making lots of money. It should be about following your passion and doing a job that one enjoys and where one can make a difference. It's also about growing as a person and becoming the best one can be.
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LisaW



Joined: 05 Apr 2007
Posts: 173

PostPosted: Fri Sep 12, 2008 1:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

KarenS wrote:

Using data from 2005-2006, New York was ahead of New Jersey in spending per student. If as you say, New Jersey spent all this money on students and ranked only 8th in the nation, I would say 8th is pretty damn good. Sure beats being 50th in the nation. By right, New Jersey's money is better spent than the states that spend less. Money is like fertilizer, it doesn't do any good unless you spread it around. So spending money on students does matter. It provides for much-needed tools(books, learning labs, etc.), well-trained teachers who can support themselves on a teaching salary and decent facilities where the students are in a safe environment. It all adds up.

(snippage)

Wouldn't it be great if every student graduated from high school and then went on to pursue their interests? That should be a goal of educating our students. For some reason this isn't happening. It's our loss as a nation when we have drop-outs who don't contribute. But as a nation, we don't value education like we should. We give it lip-service yet there is an anti-intellectual bent in this country. We don't want smart leaders, we want likeable leaders.

There is a poster that can be purchased titled "Justification for Higher Education." Unfortunately, it focuses on several cars parked in a mega-garage and a big mansion overlooking the ocean. It's good for a few laughs but getting a decent education is more than making lots of money. It should be about following your passion and doing a job that one enjoys and where one can make a difference. It's also about growing as a person and becoming the best one can be.



Throwing money at education doesn't do anything. President Bush signed one of the largest Education Bills ever ... and still gets chewed on for not supporting education. Too much of the education dollars go to too many layers of administrators. Too much of the education dollars go to teachers who should be removed for incompetence .. but aren't because they have tenure ... and a union that protects the bad ones.

Too many are not getting an education because some damn fool decided "we can't hurt their little feelings" by making those students who won't buckle down spend another year in the same class. We have students leaving schools because they see no valid need for the education -- too many texts are social studies rather than Math, Science or English. Too many don't get an education because their parents haven't emphasized the importance.

There are a lot of reasons why students aren't getting good educations. "Not enough funds" is way down that list.
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bbmedos



Joined: 26 Sep 2007
Posts: 274
Location: Western Kentucky, USA

PostPosted: Fri Sep 12, 2008 1:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I found this article:

"Fresh blood for the vampire: A beady-eyed McCain gets a boost from the charismatic Sarah Palin, a powerful new feminist -- yes, feminist! -- force. Plus: Obama must embrace his dull side."

The article itself is actually 4 Internet pages long but brings up some very interesting points.
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LizE



Joined: 22 Mar 2007
Posts: 253

PostPosted: Fri Sep 12, 2008 2:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wouldn't it be even greater if the government got out of the business of education altogether? Wouldn't it be swell if our children went to schools that were based on the child's need instead of the teacher's unions--or someone's political career?

Public schools sell junk food. They force children to sit, sometimes in front of computer screens, for hours at a stretch. Is it any surprise that more and more children are are diagnosed with ADD, ADHD, obesity and diabetes every year? The classroom is a battleground for politicians, religious leaders, community groups--and who's in the crossfire? Our kids. And it would be so easy to just end it. Give us vouchers. Let parents decide what school they want their child to attend. It's as simple as that.
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Sandlynn



Joined: 23 Mar 2007
Posts: 1808
Location: Washington, D.C.

PostPosted: Sun Sep 14, 2008 9:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Today's Post (9/14) had an article on Palin's stint as mayor:

As Mayor of Wasilla, Palin Cut Own Duties, Left Trail of Bad Blood
By Alec MacGillis
Washington Post Staff Writer
Sunday, September 14, 2008; Page A01

Palin as Mayor of Wasilla

I just "loved" this part:

"Despite the city's flush accounts, the police department under the chief Palin hired to replace Stambaugh required women who said they had been raped to pay for examination kits themselves, a policy Palin now says she rejects. State legislation passed a year later required the town to pay for the kits."
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Tee



Joined: 22 Mar 2007
Posts: 4223
Location: Detroit Metro

PostPosted: Tue Sep 16, 2008 8:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This week, I think much of the hoopla around Palin has somewhat waned and that's wonderful. Time to get real with the issues of the presidential candidates. However, I couldn't resist including this site about the skit shown on Saturday Night Live recently featuring a visit with Palin and Hillary. If you haven't already seen it, you just may enjoy it.

When the site page comes in, scroll down to about mid-page to access the movie clip.

http://freep.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080916/ENT07/809160364
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KathieO



Joined: 12 Aug 2008
Posts: 69
Location: Alaska

PostPosted: Sun Oct 26, 2008 3:55 pm    Post subject: Re: “Womenomics” & the Palin Nomination Reply with quote

maggie b. wrote:
SH wrote:
. And we have company. Increasingly men say they too want more flexibility at work. Gen X and Gen Y won't even talk about sitting at a desk for 10 hours a day.


At the risk of having tomatoes thrown at me, I would like to speak as an employer here. The last ten years of being in the hiring zone have frightened me regarding future generations. A LOT of young college and just graduated young people talk about having a LIFE and not being tied to a job like their moms and dads. Thing is, the person funding this life tends to be -- mom and dad. One girl who just turned 30 was quite stunned as mom and dad started pulling funding away and she began to realize that the life she wanted to have required MONEY.

I want to emphasize I know this is not everyone. I know there are still plenty of people with lots of ambition. I am just concerned at the growing number of people without it.

SH wrote:
Otherwise, there is a danger of Palin’s choice becoming THE choice which likely would once again turn women who choose differently into outcasts.


Uhm, I think the battle is still raging. Certainly as recently as a few years ago I can remember shows on the mommy wars (stay at home vs. working) still taking place. I don't think we can lay this at Palin's doorstep. She is the product of it, not the cause.

maggie b.


Back on topic (since the election looms and pretty much everyone here probably knows which party/candidate they are voting for) . . . maggie b - I will throw no tomatoes (I threw enough at my employers prior to the experience of standing in those shoes! Experience does a lot for one's point of view). Yes, I believe personal ambition has much (most) to do with how successfully any woman (and men, but we aren't focusing on them in this regard) drives her career. I would consider my own life as a test case.

I never walk in shame (after many years of grappling with the issue emotionally due to judgment biases of others) anymore to clearly point out I had the experience of being a pregnant teen, coming from a large family and no real money to help advance my aspirations. Through sheer determination, I have gone from the job of hotel maid as a young woman with children, to running my own business specializing in advising doctorate level business owners. Additionally, I made it to middle management without a college degree in a field full of doctorate-level co-workers. There was no way I felt I had time to fit college classes into that schedule, being a single mother for a good period of time. So my point is, it can be done when an individual has strength of character, despite the odds. Another woman very well may have added college to her load and successfully carried it out. I just knew my own limitations at the time. Society will pressure each of us into a veritable pretzel if we allow them to control all our choices. (I did eventually find my way to college in my mid-30s when my children were much older and I had more control of flexibility in my career.) The largest obstacles I ran into were people's personal biases and inflexibility as viewing us as individuals, rather than labels . . .no college degree, young mother with children, woman in a man's world in general, etc., etc. We even put these labels on ourselves, especially as women (we tend to be more "neurotic" rather than "character disordered" in our mental disabilities), and trip on our own shoelaces in the process.

I frequently find in my work that when I am training women to perform certain tasks, they are the first to shoot themselves in the foot with their own expectations and not being able to meet them all. I always advise them they will be harder on themselves than anything anyone else will throw at them. When people make up their minds they will have control over their own situations -- they generally do! It's just not an "easy path," and that's usually where the falter comes. Unfortunately, politics and the Palan issue are just another example of "labeling" someone into a corner. But believe me, I am certain she has chosen the tough business of politics with her eyes wide open, and consquently can, and is, taking the heat of her choices! Afterall, she has the dicotomy of being a beautiful woman (which absolutely draws the attention) and typically gets the "bimbo" label to overcome. I have no doubt she stepped into that arena with the knowledge of her own scrutinization. I'm certain she contemplated herself being pounded by woman even more than men (a pretty face generally does not sway us, and we are our own harshest critics afterall). In sum, once you stand up for your particular choices as a woman, you will find many who will support your self-interpretation, whatever that may be.
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xina



Joined: 22 Mar 2007
Posts: 6635
Location: minneapolis

PostPosted: Sun Oct 26, 2008 11:23 pm    Post subject: Re: “Womenomics” & the Palin Nomination Reply with quote

[quote="KathieO"][quote="maggie b."]
SH wrote:
. And we have



! Afterall, she has the dicotomy of being a beautiful woman (which absolutely draws the attention) and typically gets the "bimbo" label to overcome. I have no doubt she stepped into that arena with the knowledge of her own scrutinization. I'm certain she contemplated herself being pounded by woman even more than men (a pretty face generally does not sway us, and we are our own harshest critics afterall). .




Nope. Don't buy it. Sarah Palin may be somewhat attractive, but many very succesful women are. Her problem was of her own doing when she put her foot in her mouth one too many times with her somewhat vague and sort of robotic responses that had many saying, "huh?" and seriously questioning her qualifications for the job. In fact, I think she was put there to get the vote of women who were behind Hillary. Palin's looks have nothing to do with her lack of support by women.
As for the rest of your post Kathy....congratuations to you on all you have accomplished! Very Happy
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KathieO



Joined: 12 Aug 2008
Posts: 69
Location: Alaska

PostPosted: Mon Oct 27, 2008 3:14 am    Post subject: Regardless of Where You Stand . . . Please Stand up and Vote Reply with quote

Xina: In short, thank you for your nod of acknowledgement, and your thoughts are contemplated, by me, as always. As we approach another administration (Sara Palin and all political speculation aside), I wanted to post this information received from my much admired and missed, past Administrative Assistant, for all the extremely intelligent women that have crossed my path at AAR, and challenged my point of view (exclusively, after some years of review on other, "similar" websites!) I've NEVER ventured my personal views elsewhere, so thank you sincerely for your attention. I'm proud to have read your thoughts and opinions, and thrown my hat in the ring with this group. I value and respect each of your individual opinions put forth, because you are brave enough to do so! Regardless of where you vote, I feel privileged to have been born an American woman, and want to pass this along as inspiration for all of us to remember on voting day. . . we are still ONE nation, and so fortunate to have the RIGHT as WOMEN to stand by our convictions and voice them whole-heartedly! 1920 . . . NOT EVEN 100 YEARS IN OUR HISTORY! Ponder IT!!:

QUOTE:
"This is the story of our Mothers and Grandmothers who lived only 90 years ago.

REMEMBER, it was not until 1920 that women were granted the right to go to the polls and vote.

The women were innocent and defenseless, but they were jailed
nonetheless for picketing the White House, carrying signs asking
for the vote.

And by the end of the night, they were barely alive.
Forty prison guards wielding clubs and their warden's blessing
went on a rampage against the 33 women wrongly convicted of
'obstructing sidewalk traffic.'

(Lucy Burns)
They beat Lucy Burns, chained her hands to the cell bars above
her head and left her hanging for the night, bleeding and gasping
for air.

(Dora Lewis)
They hurled Dora Lewis into a dark cell, smashed her
head against an iron bed and knocked her out cold. Her cellmate,
Alice Cosu, thought Lewis was dead and suffered a heart attack.
Additional affidavits describe the guards grabbing, dragging,
beating, choking, slamming, pinching, twisting and kicking the women.

Thus unfolded the?'Night of Terror' on Nov. 15, 1917,
when the warden at the Occoquan Workhouse in Virginia ordered his
guards to teach a lesson to the suffragists imprisoned there because
they dared to picket Woodrow Wilson's White House for the right
to vote.

For weeks, the women's only water came from an open pail. Their
food--all of it colorless slop--was infested with worms.

(Alice Paul)
When one of the leaders, Alice Paul, embarked on a hunger strike, they tied her to a chair, forced a tube down her throat and poured liquid into her until she vomited. She was tortured like this for weeks
until word was smuggled out to the press.

So, refresh my memory. Some women won't vote this year because-
-why, exactly? We have carpool duties? We have to get to work?
Our vote doesn't matter? It's raining?

(A photo of Mrs. Pauline Adams in the prison garb she wore while serving a sixty-day sentence is presented.)
Last week, I went to a sparsely attended screening of HBO's new
movie 'Iron Jawed Angels.' It is a graphic depiction of the battle
these women waged so that I could pull the curtain at the polling
booth and have my say. I am ashamed to say I needed the reminder.

(Miss Edith Ainge, of Jamestown, New York)
All these years later, voter registration is still my passion. But the
actual act of voting had become less personal for me, more rote.
Frankly, voting often felt more like an obligation than a privilege.
Sometimes it was inconvenient.

(Berthe Arnold, CSU graduate)
My friend Wendy, who is my age and studied women's history,
saw the HBO movie, too. When she stopped by my desk to talk
about it, she looked angry. She was--with herself. 'One thought
kept coming back to me as I watched that movie,' she said.
'What would those women think of the way I use, or don't use,
my right to vote? All of us take it for granted now, not just
younger women, but those of us who did seek to learn.' The
right to vote, she said, had become valuable to her 'all over again.'

HBO released the movie on video and DVD . I wish all history,
social studies and government teachers would include the movie in
their curriculum I want it shown on Bunco night, too, and anywhere
else women gather. I realize this isn't our usual idea of socializing,
but we are not voting in the numbers that we should be, and I think
a little shock therapy is in order.

(Conferring over ratification [of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution] at [National Woman's Party] headquarters, Jackson Pl[ace] [Washington, D.C.]. L-R Mrs. Lawrence Lewis, Mrs. Abby Scott Baker, Anita Pollitzer, Alice Paul, Florence Boeckel, Mabel Vernon (standing, right))

It is jarring to watch Woodrow Wilson and his cronies try to persuade a psychiatrist to declare Alice Paul insane so that she could be permanently institutionalized. And it is inspiring to watch the doctor refuse. Alice Paul was strong, he said, and brave. That didn't make her crazy.

The doctor admonished the men: 'Courage in women is often mistaken for insanity.'

Please, if you are so inclined, pass this on to all the women you know.

"We need to get out and vote and use this right that was fought so
hard for by these very courageous women. Whether you vote democratic, republican or independent party - remember to vote.

(Helena Hill Weed, Norwalk, Conn. Serving 3 day sentence in D.C. prison for carrying banner, 'Governments derive their just powers from the consent of the governed.')
History is being made."
[END OF QUOTE]

This e-mail I received from my much beloved former "right-hand" and friend, had to be passed on. I know that all the smart women I encounter here will make it to the polls!

I sincerely respect your RIGHT to think and choose for yourselves!
My best regards to all of you!!
Kathie in Alaska
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Cora



Joined: 12 Mar 2008
Posts: 1129
Location: Bremen, Germany

PostPosted: Mon Oct 27, 2008 8:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Actually, I have seen people attacking Sarah Palin in blogs and forum posts for being a reasonably attractive, feminine looking woman. There were complaints that she smiled too much during the vice-president debate, as if she was trying to flirt with the moderator. There were comments that Ms. Palin could not be taken seriously, because she wears her hair long and wears skirts and because she does not look like a pitbull. And inevitably, the people who attacked Ms. Palin because of her looks were women. Sadly, this phenomenon is not limited to public figures like Ms Palin. Every woman who likes to wear feminine clothes and hairstyles will eventually find herself being criticized for dressing "unprofessionally" and told that it is impossible to take her seriously, if she looks like that. And the ones who say those things are other women.

There are plenty of good reasons to criticize Sarah Palin, e.g. her relative inexperience, her obvious problems articulating her position, her problematic opinions and positions on certain topics, etc... However, Ms. Palin's looks or the fact that she smiles during debates are not a valid reason to criticize her.
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xina



Joined: 22 Mar 2007
Posts: 6635
Location: minneapolis

PostPosted: Mon Oct 27, 2008 8:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cora wrote:
Actually,

There are plenty of good reasons to criticize Sarah Palin, e.g. her relative inexperience, her obvious problems articulating her position, her problematic opinions and positions on certain topics, etc... However, Ms. Palin's looks or the fact that she smiles during debates are not a valid reason to criticize her.



I haven't read/heard any of those critical things you mentioned. Smiling during interviews? How could that be bad. Frankly, I am so much a feminine fashionista....I would dearly love to see someone running for office that looks fantastic (although...I could have taken her on a shopping spree and spent at least half of her 150,000 on a fantastic wardrobe) and has experience and can interview intelligently with words of her own instead of rehearsed speech. It would be a joy, but Palin is not the one...at least to me, and apparently many other people...women and men included.
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Sterling_95



Joined: 04 Oct 2008
Posts: 212

PostPosted: Tue Oct 28, 2008 4:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't agree with a lot of Sarah Palin's personal politics, but I took up arms for her the day she was nominated. Within hours, friends who were women and working mothers, were calling her "the crazy Alaska lady with too many children". My position was only strengthened by the nasty comments that I heard about her family. Quite honestly, all the focus on Palin's family got my hackles up. I know that some say it's because Bristol's pregnancy prove that Sarah Palin can't practice what she preaches, but the Chicago Sun Times printed a story that Brack Obama's half brother lives in squalor and I didn't see the tabloids running with any criticisms of Obama. And the comments directed towards her Down Syndrome's baby are just ugly - everything from how the kid is "a freak on parade" to how he's a martyr to the pro-life cause

Quote:
.I would dearly love to see someone running for office that looks fantastic (although...I could have taken her on a shopping spree and spent at least half of her 150,000 on a fantastic wardrobe) and has experience and can interview intelligently with words of her own instead of rehearsed speech.


You realize that you probably just described Condolezza Rice, Hillary Clinton and Elizabeth Dole, right ? Very Happy They were all experienced, intelligent and articulate, but somehow none of them are held up as a feminine role model
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xina



Joined: 22 Mar 2007
Posts: 6635
Location: minneapolis

PostPosted: Tue Oct 28, 2008 5:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sterling_95 wrote:
I don't agree with a lot of Sarah Palin's personal politics, but I took up arms for her the day she was nominated. Within hours, friends who were women and working mothers, were calling her "the crazy Alaska lady with too many children". My position was only strengthened by the nasty comments that I heard about her family. Quite honestly, all the focus on Palin's family got my hackles up. I know that some say it's because Bristol's pregnancy prove that Sarah Palin can't practice what she preaches, but the Chicago Sun Times printed a story that Brack Obama's half brother lives in squalor and I didn't see the tabloids running with any criticisms of Obama. And the comments directed towards her Down Syndrome's baby are just ugly - everything from how the kid is "a freak on parade" to how he's a martyr to the pro-life cause

Quote:
.I would dearly love to see someone running for office that looks fantastic (although...I could have taken her on a shopping spree and spent at least half of her 150,000 on a fantastic wardrobe) and has experience and can interview intelligently with words of her own instead of rehearsed speech.


You realize that you probably just described Condolezza Rice, Hillary Clinton and Elizabeth Dole, right ? Very Happy They were all experienced, intelligent and articulate, but somehow none of them are held up as a feminine role model



Actually, I've enjoyed watching the younger daughter. She seems like a real spitfire...kind of like my daughter at her age. I love when she smoothed the baby's hair down with a little spit on her hand. And frankly...Palin's hubby is kind of cute. As for the 150,00 on a wardrobe, I suppose if it's spread through her whole family, that is feasible, but if she's dropping 70,000 or so at Neiman Marcus, well...that's just silly. She could get so much more for her/their $$$'s. Michele Obama was on Leno last night with a really great outfit from J. Crew, which is not the cheapest place to shop but a lot less pricey than NM.
As for HIllary Clinton....she was made fun of because of her endless pantsuits, so it's not just poor Sarah Palin being the butt of jokes.


Just to add (edit) and to address your statement about Hillary not being a feminine role model. Ah...are you kidding me?? She is absolutely a feminine role model. She paved the way for a woman to be president one day. She deserves much credit for that and personally, I backed her all the way.
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