AAR
Click here for full forums index
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 
 
Carla Kelly's My Loving Vigil Keeping

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    AAR Forum Index -> Let's Talk Romance Novels Forum
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
kari



Joined: 17 Jul 2011
Posts: 31

PostPosted: Sat Aug 04, 2012 11:01 pm    Post subject: Carla Kelly's My Loving Vigil Keeping Reply with quote

I just put down my brand-new copy of Carla's latest book My Loving Vigil Keeping, from Bonneville Books, a LDS (Mormon) publisher. Don't let that scare off those of you who aren't Mormon! This is a wonderful book. I pre-ordered it from Barnes and Noble, and it came a few days ahead of its actual release date.

Della, the heroine, is a school teacher who goes to work in a real-life community centering around a coal mine in 1899-1900 Utah. Della is the typical poor relation who was given little love or support since the death of her father, who was also a miner. Despite the odds, she managed to become independent and she is truly a good teacher who loves her work and her students. This is a romance so of course she falls in love - with a miner! The last kind of husband she ever intended to choose...

This book is about twice the length of a Regency, and I love the way this has allowed the author to get into the entire community, including Della's students and their parents. When the tragedy happens (since this book was written around a real-life tragedy, the Scofield mining explosion) it is heart-wrenching for both the reader and the heroine. Not only that, Della's miner is a widower who has a darling little girl, and that character will steal your hearts.

I also want to assure readers that while Della attends church and has the occasional conversation or situation that discusses the Mormon way of life, I believe that non-church members will have no problem understanding the occasional glimpse of the Mormon lifestyle. If you allow that to put you off from buying and reading this wonderful book, you'll be missing a real treat!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
LynnS/AAR



Joined: 22 Mar 2007
Posts: 116

PostPosted: Mon Aug 06, 2012 2:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am interested in trying that one! I like Carla Kelly's style, but I haven't read any of the books that she's done for the Mormon press.

I didn't discover Kelly until I came to AAR so I still have backlist to savor.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
kari



Joined: 17 Jul 2011
Posts: 31

PostPosted: Mon Aug 06, 2012 5:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lynn, this is definitely the one to try as your first Mormon inspirational. After finishing this one I went back and read Borrowed Light and Enduring Light, which have been sitting on my tbr mountain for awhile, since I knew they were both a little more on the inspirational side and I tend to avoid inspirationals of any creed. (I don't care for being preached at, even when it's my religion.) I should have known better - Carla doesn't ever preach. I loved both of them, and particularly appreciated their length and the fact that the second book picks up just about where the first one leaves off. I wasn't at all ready to leave Julia, Paul and the rest of the gang.

Where those two books really shine is the detailed facts of life on the Wyoming cattle range. Carla's skills as a historian are tremendous. (I believe that her history degree centered on the Indian Wars, plus she spent years with living history as a ranger up in North Dakota, if I recall correctly.) The Native American characters felt real to me, and the hero is of course half Indian. I was warmed by so much. Julia's family, and how they coped with tragedy, had me in tears. The facts about the LDS church and how it was practiced and viewed a century ago also moved me. (Julia's treatment of the itinerant preacher in Borrowed Light makes you want to stand up and cheer. I too have faced down a narrow-minded "Christian" who tried to tell me some "facts" about the history of my church.) The dozens of recipes that Julia cooks for her cowboys sound (mostly) so good, and I was happy to find some recipes at the end of Enduring Light, though I don't think I will ever try Rocky Mountain Oysters or Sonofagun Stew.

At any rate, I hope that some of you will try My Loving Vigil Keeping. Don't be surprised when you finish it and find that the next thing you do is to get on your computer with Amazon or Barnes and Noble to order Borrowed Light and Enduring Light!

PS: my favorite Regency by Carla Kelly is Mrs. Drew Plays Her Hand. If you haven't read that one yet, you're in for a real treat!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
TerryS



Joined: 07 May 2011
Posts: 53

PostPosted: Mon Aug 13, 2012 4:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Kari, thank you for bringing this book to my attention. I downloaded it in ebook form the day it became available and have just finished reading it.

I am several generations removed from my own coal mining ancestors. Ancestors who would have been mining in a different part of the country but at the same time as those miners of Winters Quarters.

Carla Kelly waved her own brand of word magic to tell this tale, and it was beautifully and touchingly done. I am proud of my own coal mining roots and I can't say how much her portrayal of the miners and their families affected me. But then, that is Carla Kelly's specialty.

In any case, this is a book that will go on my own DIK shelf.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Carla Kelly



Joined: 27 Mar 2007
Posts: 193

PostPosted: Mon Aug 13, 2012 5:46 pm    Post subject: Carla Kelly's My Loving Vigil Keeping Reply with quote

Terri, I have to tell you, this book is twanging a real chord with miners' children and descendants out here. These British Isles miners and Finns who came to Winter Quarters to mine were deeply conscious of the American Dream, and the role it would play in their children's lives. As Owen Davis points out, where would Angharad ever have even the glimmer of a chance to go to college some day, but here?

Interestingly, William Parmley's son, Thomas (1897-1997) got a PhD at Cornell Univ., and taught physics at the University of Utah. Both Thomas's father William, and his uncle Thomas, went into the pits in England when they were children. It only took one generation for the American Dream to bloom for Dr. Parmley.

So many of these characters are real people. Researching them turned out to be one of the joys of my life. And when I finished the manuscript, I took white roses to some of "my guys" in the Scofield Cemetery. They're with me still.

It's that kind of book. What a rare privilege to write it.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
TerryS



Joined: 07 May 2011
Posts: 53

PostPosted: Tue Aug 14, 2012 10:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Carla, I liked the thought of the white roses - thank you for sharing that and for sharing the information on William Parmley’s son. It is heartening to know that even in the aftermath of such a horrific tragedy, personal triumphs would still await some of the surviving family members.

You’ve written a special book that will be with me for a long time.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    AAR Forum Index -> Let's Talk Romance Novels Forum All times are GMT - 5 Hours
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group